Thursday, January 9, 2014


5 comments:

  1. As a watercolor teacher, I think this tool is a decent one for learning technique. It's really uncanny how it makes fluid color transitions and simplifies shapes. tBeyond that one must learn to inject the painting with their own personality, something the program can't understand. Working from photos, it helps, of course, to start with a well designed composition, as Howard did. Marc Josloff

    ReplyDelete
  2. I wonder if true art will be appreciated if anyone can become an "artist" with this tool. Does it (pardon the pun) "water" down the craft? I do agree that it is a good tool for simplification -- if used correctly.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's cheating!!! But it does reveal a great little watercolor replica!! Kind of like a postcard... It's a fraud!!! LOL

    ReplyDelete
  4. I can see everyone's point of view. It's a great tool in that it gives guidance as far as approaching a watercolor painting from a photo, and what the end result may look like. But it will definitely "water down" the craft if anyone with an app can do this and sell it as art. Technology is great, until it does away with humans and their livelihood.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It would really be perverse if we came to the point where we started to copy robots rather than the other way around, wouldn't it? That said, there are certain types of interpretation that are common to the watercolor media which can be reinforced by watching how the app does it. Plus, I'm sure that waterlogue app is based upon decisions and works of wc artists that were fed into it during the development of the program. That, unfortunately is also what happens when we try to emulate the work of popular artists who are featured in books, magazines and workshops. The students try to copy the decisions of the featured artist instead of exploring their own range of solutions. It's the nature of the game.

    ReplyDelete